Click on the sections below to arrange and browse course options in different ways.

  • Examining the Beautiful

    ARPL 101 Introduction to Architecture

    This course introduces students to the world of design and architecture, its concepts, theory, language, practice, and ethics, and to associated and related fields (such as interior, landscape, graphic, and industrial design, to planning, construction, and development). It also introduces them to the world of the architectural student and intern and to management of the demands it will make of them. Students will learn to raise their powers of observation and design awareness, and increase their sensitivity toward the quality of the designed environment. (This course counts as a general elective in the School of Arts and Sciences; it does not fulfill a humanities distribution requirement.)

    ARPL 211 History of Architecture I

    This course explores the history of world architecture and city planning from its beginnings to the end of the Romanesque period (Carolingian). Examples will be discussed with respect to aesthetic principles, symbolism and cultural meaning, site and urban design, spatial sequence, detailing, and construction and systems technology, and in the context of their behavioral, cultural, political, religious, ecological, and economic environments.

    ART 101 Fundamentals of Design I

    Introductory studio art course; primary goal is the development of an awareness and appreciation of the visual experience and of the limitless possibilities for making things of beauty and delight. Learning based largely on a conscious amassing of visual experiences and the development of seeing, upon which, eventually, to realize one's own visual language and visual value judgments. Studio exercises and lectures consider two-dimensional work and color. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a $30 course fee assessed to their student accounts.

    ART 201 Drawing and Composition I

    Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account.

    ART 202 Drawing and Composition II

    Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Studio, six hours per week. 201 is not prerequisite to 202. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account.

    ART 211 History of Art: Prehistory to the Middle Ages

    A survey of Western art from prehistory to the Middle Ages. Assists the student in a visual and critical understanding of the art of the past. The Western tradition investigated, with emphasis on such art forms as sculpture, painting, and architecture.

    ART 325 Rococo to Romanticism

    Examines the Neoclassical and Romantic movements in Western art and culture from 1750 to 1850. Charts the impact of the Academie, the role of classical art and its early tradition, and the rise of the avant garde. Artists to be studied include David, Goya, Gericault, Delacroix, Constable, Turner and Friedrich.

    ART 346 Art, Religion and Magic in Renaissance and Baroque Italy

    This course explores Renaissance and Baroque beliefs in the power of images to transform their beholders. The idea that images might produce profound mental and physical changes in viewers was widely articulated in the period 1450 to 1650. They might soothe a troubled soul, create healthy and beautiful bodies, and mitigate physical suffering. This course will consider varied types of images, including miraculous images, and magical images, their functions and their efficacy. How did images heal the sick, cheer distressed or melancholic beholders, or transform the physical appearance of their beholders? To what extent did the expectations of efficacy attaching to paintings differ from other forms of talismanic images? Among the questions this course will consider: how did artists approach the creation of images with such expectations in mind? And knowing that their paintings were supposed to transform, how did they address specific audiences (male vs. female, for example)?

    DR 101 Theater I

    Introduction to Drama examines how language can be manipulated to enhance the depth and understanding of human communication through live performance. The course focuses on how that communication can be used, modified, and reinforced as a medium of artistic expression. This is an introductory humanities course designed for students from all university disciplines interested in live theatre as a performance art in the 21st century. Students focus on the creation of theatrical experiences through the structure and balance of a play’s components. These include text, performance, direction, design, and presentational space. The plays studied within the course address many social issues of contemporary society. Attendance of live theatrical performances is an integral part of the course structure.

    DR 206 Acting I

    Self discovery. Acting I is an introduction to the basic elements of the Stanislavski system. Students train in exercises to develop concentration, imagination and life observation. Improvisations will encourage physical freedom and a sense of truth. This beginning work will teach stage craft, "moment to moment" spontaneity and a specific approach to researching and rehearsing a contemporary scene and monologue.

    ENG 231 The History of English Lit I

    A general survey and analysis of selected works from the beginnings of English literature to the present, delineating general historical patterns that provide a foundation for subsequent study. 231 starts with the Middle Ages and goes through the eighteenth century; 232 begins with the Romantic movement and closes with the moderns. Covers a broad range of materials, also pauses at regular intervals to consider individual works in depth.

    HUM 101 Classics in Conversation

    Explores fundamental human questions through great and greatly influential works of literature from the Western tradition. In small classes you will read and discuss some of the world’s most beautiful and profound poetry, drama, and prose. Essential reading for those seeking self-knowledge or insight into war and peace, nobility and baseness, heaven and hell and the here-and-now, death, forgiveness, the limits of human knowledge and power, or our restlessness and yearning and our chances of settling down and finally finding satisfaction.

    MDIA 201 Intro to Media Studies

    Students learn basic media literacy by developing conceptual tools to think critically about cinema, television, advertising, print journalism, the internet, etc. The course focuses on the process of reading media texts from distinct rhetorical perspectives--in terms of a text's form and in terms of its relationships to audiences, authors, and the real world--in order to explore how the mass media shape and convey meaning.

    PHYS 103 Astronomy

    A descriptive course in astronomy and scientific cosmology intended for non-concentrators. Observing nights and field trips are an integral part of the course.

  • Globetrotting

    ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultures in a Global Society

    An ideal course for first year students, this course helps you understand your place in the world. Students think critically and systematically about the diversity of people and cultures. As we read about and discuss contemporary individuals in their families and societies, we consider how lives are affected by media images and information, transnational markets, consumer desires, global ecology, conflicting aspirations, religious revivals, and rewritten histories. Through a global perspective, we look at individuals in society by learning about their worldviews, ways of making a living, social arrangements, and belief systems. It establishes the foundations for ANTH 200 and 201, including concepts and methods of cultural anthropology, especially the concept of culture and the logic and practice of fieldwork.

    ANTH 105 Human Evolution

    How do archaeologists use science to reconstruct the past? How do we find important archaeological sites, and how do we study them? The answers to these and related questions are explored as you learn about scientific approaches to data collection; how artifacts and other remains are studied and interpreted; as well as basic field, laboratory and dating techniques. Part of this introductory course allows you to learn how the past shapes the present, how archaeology sheds light on the past where history is absent or silent; why archaeology is relevant to contemporary society, the importance of cultural heritage; and the good, the bad and the ugly about Indiana Jones!

    ANTH 108 Introduction to Archeology

    As an introduction to scientific Human Evolution this course focuses on how Homo sapiens sapiens developed biologically and culturally using the latest scientific evidence from genetics, comparisons with non-human primates and the incredible fossil and archaeological record of our evolution.

    The class begins with the interesting history of evolutionary thinking from a diverse group of Europeans that provided the basic ideas of our modern scientific approach. Next, we consider heredity, how we acquire our unique set of biological traits. To understand heredity, students are introduced to cell and population genetics. In an effort to explain our unique behavioral developments, students consider living non-human primates as our closest ancestors. Lastly, the course traces the fascinating fossil and archaeological evidence of our earliest ancestors and tracks the rapid spread of Homo sapiens across the globe.

    ANTH 214: Anthropology of Food

    With almost 6 billion people to feed and unprecedented levels of human impact on the environment, many cultural, social, and environmental questions surround the supply of food. Are there ethical and non-ethical ways to produce food? How does food production relate to a healthy environment? What happens to food as it moves from the farmer to the dinner plate? How does food become an expression of our social selves? This course uses an anthropological perspective to assess these and related questions in the production, processing and consumption of food.

    ARAB 101: Introduction to Modern Standard Arabic

    This introduction course to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) uses video-based course materials and focuses on developing proficiency in the standard written Arabic language, as well as formal spoken Arabic understood by educated speakers across the Arab world. The course begins with learning the script and the sound system using Alf-Baa as a core text. The book simultaneously introduces vocabulary so that students can begin performing dialogues and other activities from the first week. After the alphabet is covered, students complete the first chapters of Al-Kitaab Part 1 in which more grammar and vocabulary are introduced at a faster rate to build the foundation for general communicative competence and greater cultural awareness.

    ARPL 211 History of Architecture I

    This course explores the history of world architecture and city planning from its beginnings to the end of the Romanesque period (Carolingian). Examples will be discussed with respect to aesthetic principles, symbolism and cultural meaning, site and urban design, spatial sequence, detailing, and construction and systems technology, and in the context of their behavioral, cultural, political, religious, ecological, and economic environments.

    ART 211 History of Art: Prehistory to the Middle Ages

    A survey of Western art from prehistory to the Middle Ages. Assists the student in a visual and critical understanding of the art of the past. The Western tradition investigated, with emphasis on such art forms as sculpture, painting, and architecture.

    ART 325 Rococo to Romanticism

    Examines the Neoclassical and Romantic movements in Western art and culture from 1750 to 1850. Charts the impact of the Academie, the role of classical art and its early tradition, and the rise of the avant garde. Artists to be studied include David, Goya, Gericault, Delacroix, Constable, Turner and Friedrich.

    ART 346 Art, Religion and Magic in Renaissance and Baroque Italy

    This course explores Renaissance and Baroque beliefs in the power of images to transform their beholders. The idea that images might produce profound mental and physical changes in viewers was widely articulated in the period 1450 to 1650. They might soothe a troubled soul, create healthy and beautiful bodies, and mitigate physical suffering. This course will consider varied types of images, including miraculous images, and magical images, their functions and their efficacy. How did images heal the sick, cheer distressed or melancholic beholders, or transform the physical appearance of their beholders? To what extent did the expectations of efficacy attaching to paintings differ from other forms of talismanic images? Among the questions this course will consider: how did artists approach the creation of images with such expectations in mind? And knowing that their paintings were supposed to transform, how did they address specific audiences (male vs. female, for example)?

    CHN 101: Beginning Mandarin Chinese I

    This beginner's course is designed for students who desire to study Chinese systematically. The course uses video-based material to introduce the language in real-life settings. Pinyin and simplified characters are used. Accurate pronunciation, tones, and grammatical expressions are the main focuses for this semester.

    CLAS 211 Greek and Roman Mythology

    The myths of the Greeks and Romans are ways of thinking about the relationship between man and the gods, the forces of nature, and the universe. This course invites you to think about familiar stories in new ways, and to learn new stories, too. Subjects studied will include creation myths, the divinities and heroes, and the stories of the Trojan War. Excerpts from ancient literature and examples from ancient art help to show how ancient peoples represented and talked about their beliefs.

    ECON 100 Fundamentals of Economics

    A one semester introduction to the principles of both micro- and macroeconomics. Microeconomics topics will include the basics of supply and demand, the behavior of consumers and businesses, and how markets operate. Macroeconomic topics will include the fundamental components of gross domestic product(GDP), the problems of inflation and unemployment, the impacts of government fiscal and monetary policies, and economic growth.

    ENG 231 The History of English Lit I

    A general survey and analysis of selected works from the beginnings of English literature to the present, delineating general historical patterns that provide a foundation for subsequent study. 231 starts with the Middle Ages and goes through the eighteenth century; 232 begins with the Romantic movement and closes with the moderns. Covers a broad range of materials, also pauses at regular intervals to consider individual works in depth.

    HIST 235 Medieval World

    This course offers a broad survey of medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500), a formative period in western society known for its soaring gothic cathedrals, the culture of chivalry, church and state power struggles, the crusades, the Black Death, Dante, and the emergence of the inquisition. We will examine western Christendom in the making by tracing the growth of its central institutions alongside its encounters with others—Pagans, Jews and Muslims—as it sought to expand its horizons and borders. Readings will emphasize primary sources in translation. No previous knowledge of the Middle Ages is assumed.

    HIST 257 The Making of America, 1607-1877

    The United States we know today was forged through centuries of hard-fought struggles. This course provides an overview of American History in the first 270 years. It surveys early contests between indigenous peoples and European empires, colonists' rebellion in the American Revolution, and political conundrums in the early United States. It also explains divisive economic transformations and immigration patterns, conflicts during westward expansion, women's and African Americans' demands for inclusion, reform efforts to overcome social ills, new religious awakenings, and struggles over slavery and the country's economic future. The course concludes with the accelerating centrifugal forces that brought on the Civil War, and how Americans began rebuilding the fractured nation into a new society.

    IRSH 101: Irish Language and Culture I

    Introduction to the Irish language and to Irish culture. There will be a second semester course offered in the spring. Irish language and culture courses do not fulfill the university's language requirement. They present an introduction to Irish culture through the Irish (Celtic) language.

    ITAL 220:The Splendor of Rome in Literature & Film

    Famous twins Romulus and Remus were merely the first two artists who shaped Rome, one of the most beautiful, complex, and recounted cities in the world! The Eternal City, as it is often referred to, is the physical embodiment of a complex identity as it the point of reference for many artists and travelers who have journeyed and relentlessly tried to construct images for its beauty. During this virtual walk through Rome's (particularly modern) history, students will encounter works revealing the singular allure of the space of the city that is twice a capital. From the work of world-renown directors Federico Fellini and Vittorio De Sica to that of writers Alberto Moravia and Amara Lakhous, students will enjoy the dolce vita (sweet life) and the cultural import of Rome in poetry, in music, in the visual arts, and cinema. Taught in English. Same as MDIA 307. Satisfies requirements for HUM and LIT.

    PHYS 103 Astronomy

    A descriptive course in astronomy and scientific cosmology intended for non-concentrators. Observing nights and field trips are an integral part of the course.

    POL 112 Introduction to Comparative Politics

    An introduction to the basic principles of government as exemplified by the developed countries of Europe, the post-communist states of Eastern Europe, and developing countries elsewhere. Depending on the instructor, will examine themes of democratization, institutional design (presidential vs. Parliamentary systems, electoral systems), parties and party systems, and/or in the impact of social and economic change on the conduct and evolution of modern political systems. Required.

    SOC 102 Global Social Problems and Social Justice

    Sociological analysis of selected social problems. Discussion of the causes of social problems, the processes by which they are brought to public attention, and evaluation of attempts to solve them.

    SOC 320 Terrorism and Counter Terrorism

    This course introduces students to the historical and current terrorist threats at both national and international levels. Terrorists organizations, their motivations, strategies, tactics and targets will be discussed. The various national and international counter terrorism measures past and present will also be presented in the course.

  • Culture/Civilization

    ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultures in a Global Society

    An ideal course for first year students, this course helps you understand your place in the world. Students think critically and systematically about the diversity of people and cultures. As we read about and discuss contemporary individuals in their families and societies, we consider how lives are affected by media images and information, transnational markets, consumer desires, global ecology, conflicting aspirations, religious revivals, and rewritten histories. Through a global perspective, we look at individuals in society by learning about their worldviews, ways of making a living, social arrangements, and belief systems. It establishes the foundations for ANTH 200 and 201, including concepts and methods of cultural anthropology, especially the concept of culture and the logic and practice of fieldwork.

    ANTH 105 Human Evolution

    How do archaeologists use science to reconstruct the past? How do we find important archaeological sites, and how do we study them? The answers to these and related questions are explored as you learn about scientific approaches to data collection; how artifacts and other remains are studied and interpreted; as well as basic field, laboratory and dating techniques. Part of this introductory course allows you to learn how the past shapes the present, how archaeology sheds light on the past where history is absent or silent; why archaeology is relevant to contemporary society, the importance of cultural heritage; and the good, the bad and the ugly about Indiana Jones!

    ANTH 108 Introduction to Archeology

    As an introduction to scientific Human Evolution this course focuses on how Homo sapiens sapiens developed biologically and culturally using the latest scientific evidence from genetics, comparisons with non-human primates and the incredible fossil and archaeological record of our evolution.

    The class begins with the interesting history of evolutionary thinking from a diverse group of Europeans that provided the basic ideas of our modern scientific approach. Next, we consider heredity, how we acquire our unique set of biological traits. To understand heredity, students are introduced to cell and population genetics. In an effort to explain our unique behavioral developments, students consider living non-human primates as our closest ancestors. Lastly, the course traces the fascinating fossil and archaeological evidence of our earliest ancestors and tracks the rapid spread of Homo sapiens across the globe.

    ANTH 200: Core Perspectives in Anthropology

    Introduces core perspectives that distinguish anthropological approaches, their relation to other social and natural sciences, to philosophy and the humanities, and how they apply across different theories about meaning, structure, and agency in human social life and culture. Fall semesters.

    ANTH 202: Sex and Culture in Modern World.

    This course examines sex and gender issues in societies around the world that have been brought into the web of the modern world. It focuses on the creation, maintenance, and change of cultural differences in gender; the work of culture in sexuality; and equality and inequality between the sexes in different societies. It examines our own commonsense understanding and practices, and the various critical stances of "feminism."

    ANTH 214: Anthropology of Food

    With almost 6 billion people to feed and unprecedented levels of human impact on the environment, many cultural, social, and environmental questions surround the supply of food. Are there ethical and non-ethical ways to produce food? How does food production relate to a healthy environment? What happens to food as it moves from the farmer to the dinner plate? How does food become an expression of our social selves? This course uses an anthropological perspective to assess these and related questions in the production, processing and consumption of food.

    ANTH 240:Politics of the Past: An Introduction to Cultural Heritage Studies

    What makes the past meaningful to individuals, communities, nations, and the world? How is cultural heritage mobilized to build identity, social cohesion, develop tourist markets, encourage financial investment, and stake political claims? This course critically examines western relationships to the past tied to property and rooted in the colonial drive to plunder, collect, and catalogue, and how non-Western heritage frameworks both complement and challenge this conception. In addition to the tangible material remains of the past, the course also explores heritage¿s `intangible¿ dimensions, from folklore, music, dance and festivals to language, knowledge, and even landscapes. The focus is on how cultural heritage is embedded in everyday life and how the past is political, continuing to live on and be creatively reinterpreted in the present.

    ANTH 254:Ancient Cultures of South America

    Archeology study of the prehistoric societies, their environment, and cultures that gave rise to pre-Columbian cities and states.

    ARAB 101: Introduction to Modern Standard Arabic

    This introduction course to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) uses video-based course materials and focuses on developing proficiency in the standard written Arabic language, as well as formal spoken Arabic understood by educated speakers across the Arab world. The course begins with learning the script and the sound system using Alf-Baa as a core text. The book simultaneously introduces vocabulary so that students can begin performing dialogues and other activities from the first week. After the alphabet is covered, students complete the first chapters of Al-Kitaab Part 1 in which more grammar and vocabulary are introduced at a faster rate to build the foundation for general communicative competence and greater cultural awareness.

    ARPL 211 History of Architecture I

    This course explores the history of world architecture and city planning from its beginnings to the end of the Romanesque period (Carolingian). Examples will be discussed with respect to aesthetic principles, symbolism and cultural meaning, site and urban design, spatial sequence, detailing, and construction and systems technology, and in the context of their behavioral, cultural, political, religious, ecological, and economic environments.

    ART 211 History of Art: Prehistory to the Middle Ages

    A survey of Western art from prehistory to the Middle Ages. Assists the student in a visual and critical understanding of the art of the past. The Western tradition investigated, with emphasis on such art forms as sculpture, painting, and architecture.

    CHN 101: Beginning Mandarin Chinese I

    This beginner's course is designed for students who desire to study Chinese systematically. The course uses video-based material to introduce the language in real-life settings. Pinyin and simplified characters are used. Accurate pronunciation, tones, and grammatical expressions are the main focuses for this semester.

    CLAS 211 Greek and Roman Mythology

    The myths of the Greeks and Romans are ways of thinking about the relationship between man and the gods, the forces of nature, and the universe. This course invites you to think about familiar stories in new ways, and to learn new stories, too. Subjects studied will include creation myths, the divinities and heroes, and the stories of the Trojan War. Excerpts from ancient literature and examples from ancient art help to show how ancient peoples represented and talked about their beliefs.

    ECON 100 Fundamentals of Economics

    A one semester introduction to the principles of both micro- and macroeconomics. Microeconomics topics will include the basics of supply and demand, the behavior of consumers and businesses, and how markets operate. Macroeconomic topics will include the fundamental components of gross domestic product(GDP), the problems of inflation and unemployment, the impacts of government fiscal and monetary policies, and economic growth.

    ECON 101 Principles of Macroeconomics

    An introduction to the study of open economy macroeconomic principles. It is concerned with the behavior of the economy as a whole. It studies the foundations of macroeconomic theory and their application to domestic and international macroeconomic policy. It is useful for students concentrating in other fields.

    ECON 102 Principles of Microeconomics

    An introduction to microeconomic principles. Students will be introduced to the analytical tools of microeconomic analysis used to examine the behavior of consumers and producers, and how they interact in various types of market structures to determine prices and outputs. Students are also introduced to market failures and to alternative policies that may be implemented to deal with them.

    ENG 231 The History of English Lit I

    A general survey and analysis of selected works from the beginnings of English literature to the present, delineating general historical patterns that provide a foundation for subsequent study. 231 starts with the Middle Ages and goes through the eighteenth century; 232 begins with the Romantic movement and closes with the moderns. Covers a broad range of materials, also pauses at regular intervals to consider individual works in depth.

    ENG 235 American Literature I

    Reading in works by major authors from the colonial period through the 19th century.

    HIST 142 - The Mongol Empire: Fire and Blood, Silk and Love across Eurasia

    HIST 235 Medieval World

    This course offers a broad survey of medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500), a formative period in western society known for its soaring gothic cathedrals, the culture of chivalry, church and state power struggles, the crusades, the Black Death, Dante, and the emergence of the inquisition. We will examine western Christendom in the making by tracing the growth of its central institutions alongside its encounters with others—Pagans, Jews and Muslims—as it sought to expand its horizons and borders. Readings will emphasize primary sources in translation. No previous knowledge of the Middle Ages is assumed.

    HIST 257 The Making of America, 1607-1877

    The United States we know today was forged through centuries of hard-fought struggles. This course provides an overview of American History in the first 270 years. It surveys early contests between indigenous peoples and European empires, colonists' rebellion in the American Revolution, and political conundrums in the early United States. It also explains divisive economic transformations and immigration patterns, conflicts during westward expansion, women's and African Americans' demands for inclusion, reform efforts to overcome social ills, new religious awakenings, and struggles over slavery and the country's economic future. The course concludes with the accelerating centrifugal forces that brought on the Civil War, and how Americans began rebuilding the fractured nation into a new society.

    IRSH 101: Irish Language and Culture I

    Introduction to the Irish language and to Irish culture. There will be a second semester course offered in the spring. Irish language and culture courses do not fulfill the university’s language requirement. They present an introduction to Irish culture through the Irish (Celtic) language. No prerequisites.

    MDIA 201 Intro to Media Studies

    Students learn basic media literacy by developing conceptual tools to think critically about cinema, television, advertising, print journalism, the internet, etc. The course focuses on the process of reading media texts from distinct rhetorical perspectives--in terms of a text's form and in terms of its relationships to audiences, authors, and the real world--in order to explore how the mass media shape and convey meaning.

    POL 111 Introduction to American Government

    An introduction to the basic institutions and principles of American government with particular attention to constitutional foundations, historical development, and the linkages between those institutions and the public.

    PSY 216 Psychology of Religion

    Religion is one of the most powerful forces driving individual experience and the larger society and world. This course will explore the psychology underpinning this force. Beginning with introductions to classic writings by William James, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and Abraham Maslow, the course will explore why people become committed to religious beliefs and the ways in which religious institutions interact with individuals and groups. The course will examine religious fanaticism and terrorism through empirical, phenomenological and sociological approaches.

    SOC 102 Global Social Problems and Social Justice

    Sociological analysis of selected social problems. Discussion of the causes of social problems, the processes by which they are brought to public attention, and evaluation of attempts to solve them.

    SOC 320 Terrorism and Counter Terrorism

    This course introduces students to the historical and current terrorist threats at both national and international levels. Terrorists organizations, their motivations, strategies, tactics and targets will be discussed. The various national and international counter terrorism measures past and present will also be presented in the course.

    SSS 101 Introduction to Social Work

    An overview of the profession of social work within the institution of social welfare. Basic definitions, historical development, trends in social welfare and social work. May include guest lecturers. Twenty-four (24) hours of volunteer experience during the semester is required.

  • Learning with your Hands

    ANTH 108 Introduction to Archeology

    As an introduction to scientific Human Evolution this course focuses on how  Homo sapiens sapiens developed biologically and culturally using the latest scientific evidence from genetics, comparisons with non-human primates and the incredible fossil and archaeological record of our evolution.

    The class begins with the interesting history of evolutionary thinking from a diverse group of Europeans that provided the basic ideas of our modern scientific approach. Next, we consider heredity, how we acquire our unique set of biological traits. To understand heredity, students are introduced to cell and population genetics. In an effort to explain our unique behavioral developments, students consider living non-human primates as our closest ancestors. Lastly, the course traces the fascinating fossil and archaeological evidence of our earliest ancestors and tracks the rapid spread of  Homo sapiens across the globe.

    ARPL 101 Introduction to Architecture

    This course introduces students to the world of design and architecture, its concepts, theory, language, practice, and ethics, and to associated and related fields (such as interior, landscape, graphic, and industrial design, to planning, construction, and development). It also introduces them to the world of the architectural student and intern and to management of the demands it will make of them. Students will learn to raise their powers of observation and design awareness, and increase their sensitivity toward the quality of the designed environment. (This course counts as a general elective in the School of Arts and Sciences; it does not fulfill a humanities distribution requirement.)

    ART 101 Fundamentals of Design I

    Introductory studio art course; primary goal is the development of an awareness and appreciation of the visual experience and of the limitless possibilities for making things of beauty and delight. Learning based largely on a conscious amassing of visual experiences and the development of seeing, upon which, eventually, to realize one's own visual language and visual value judgments. Studio exercises and lectures consider two-dimensional work and color. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a $30 course fee assessed to their student accounts.

    ART 201 Drawing and Composition I

    Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account.

    ART 202 Drawing and Composition II

    Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Studio, six hours per week. 201 is not prerequisite to 202. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account.

    ASL 101 American Sign Language I

    An introductory course in American Sign Language as developed and used by the Deaf community in most areas of North America. It brings students into communication, followed by instruction and practice in basic vocabulary, syntax, fingerspelling, grammatical non-manual signals, sentence structure, elementary conversation, and literature. In addition, the course provides cultural knowledge and various issues raised by examining ASL and the understanding of Deaf community.

    CHEM 103 General Chemistry I & CHEM 113 Chem Lab

    General Chemistry I begins the exploration of the field of chemistry beginning with the atom and atomic structure and progressing to molecules, molecular bonding descriptions and interactions between molecules. The lab course provides experiential demonstrations of principles covered in lecture and is a co-requisite of the lecture course. It satisfies a science distribution course for any major. The class assumes no prior HS chemistry, but does assume familiarity with algebra. CHEM 103, taken with the laboratory course - CHEM 113, is the first course in chemistry for chemistry, environmental chemistry, and biochemistry majors. This is also the first course in the chemistry sequence required for students planning to apply to medical or dental school.

    CSC 104 Introduction to Computers I

    Elementary programming in a high-level language intended for liberal arts majors who want an introduction to computing history, computer concepts, hardware, software, and application software such as operating systems, graphics, word processing, databases and spreadsheets. Introduces general problem-solving techniques including the concepts of step-wise refinement applied to the development of algorithms.

    CSC 106 Introduction to Computer Programming for non-Engineers

    Students will be provided with the basic knowledge and practical experience to understand computer programming. This will be accomplished by having the students learn the Python programming language. The course is intended to be beneficial to non-technical majors with little to no knowledge of computer programming but may also be useful to students with some programming experience that would simply like to learn Python. The course will help form a mental framework for students so they can not only understand some of the basic tools used by computer scientists but also how to use those tools themselves. By taking the course, students will understand basic computer science concepts such as variables, expressions, statements, functions, conditionals, recursion, strings and more. These concepts will be developed in a deep and significant way as students create their own programs using the popular and freely available Python programming language.

    DR 102: Introduction to the Alexander Technique

    This class is an introduction to the principles of the Alexander Technique. The course is designed for performers and anyone else who want to free their bodies for maximum efficiency for self-expression. It will enable the student to identify harmful habits that interfere with their freedom of movement and balance. Students will learn to release bodily tension and move with more ease and poise thus becoming more conscious and accountable for the way they use their bodies. Classwork includes understanding Alexander's principles, simple anatomy, developmental movement, breathing, relaxation techniques, and class presentations. Course book required first day of class.

    DR 205: Introduction to Speech Communication

    Theory and exercises in speech communication, emphasizing perception, language (verbal and nonverbal), and interaction. Students apply principles in a variety of transactions.

    DR 206 Acting I

    Self discovery. Acting I is an introduction to the basic elements of the Stanislavski system. Students train in exercises to develop concentration, imagination and life observation. Improvisations will encourage physical freedom and a sense of truth. This beginning work will teach stage craft, "moment to moment" spontaneity and a specific approach to researching and rehearsing a contemporary scene and monologue.

    PHYS 103 Astronomy

    A descriptive course in astronomy and scientific cosmology intended for non-concentrators. Observing nights and field trips are an integral part of the course.

    SSS 101 Introduction to Social Work

    An overview of the profession of social work within the institution of social welfare. Basic definitions, historical development, trends in social welfare and social work. May include guest lecturers. Twenty-four (24) hours of volunteer experience during the semester is required.

  • Once upon a Time

    ANTH 105 Human Evolution

    How do archaeologists use science to reconstruct the past? How do we find important archaeological sites, and how do we study them? The answers to these and related questions are explored as you learn about scientific approaches to data collection; how artifacts and other remains are studied and interpreted; as well as basic field, laboratory and dating techniques. Part of this introductory course allows you to learn how the past shapes the present, how archaeology sheds light on the past where history is absent or silent; why archaeology is relevant to contemporary society, the importance of cultural heritage; and the good, the bad and the ugly about Indiana Jones!

    ANTH 108 Introduction to Archeology

    As an introduction to scientific Human Evolution this course focuses on how  Homo sapiens sapiens developed biologically and culturally using the latest scientific evidence from genetics, comparisons with non-human primates and the incredible fossil and archaeological record of our evolution.

    The class begins with the interesting history of evolutionary thinking from a diverse group of Europeans that provided the basic ideas of our modern scientific approach. Next, we consider heredity, how we acquire our unique set of biological traits. To understand heredity, students are introduced to cell and population genetics. In an effort to explain our unique behavioral developments, students consider living non-human primates as our closest ancestors. Lastly, the course traces the fascinating fossil and archaeological evidence of our earliest ancestors and tracks the rapid spread of  Homo sapiens across the globe.

    ARPL 211 History of Architecture I

    This course explores the history of world architecture and city planning from its beginnings to the end of the Romanesque period (Carolingian). Examples will be discussed with respect to aesthetic principles, symbolism and cultural meaning, site and urban design, spatial sequence, detailing, and construction and systems technology, and in the context of their behavioral, cultural, political, religious, ecological, and economic environments.

    ART 211 History of Art: Prehistory to the Middle Ages

    A survey of Western art from prehistory to the Middle Ages. Assists the student in a visual and critical understanding of the art of the past. The Western tradition investigated, with emphasis on such art forms as sculpture, painting, and architecture.

    CLAS 105 Reading the Greeks

    CLAS 211 Greek and Roman Mythology

    The myths of the Greeks and Romans are ways of thinking about the relationship between man and the gods, the forces of nature, and the universe. This course invites you to think about familiar stories in new ways, and to learn new stories, too. Subjects studied will include creation myths, the divinities and heroes, and the stories of the Trojan War. Excerpts from ancient literature and examples from ancient art help to show how ancient peoples represented and talked about their beliefs.

    DR 101 Theater I

    Introduction to Drama examines how language can be manipulated to enhance the depth and understanding of human communication through live performance. The course focuses on how that communication can be used, modified, and reinforced as a medium of artistic expression. This is an introductory humanities course designed for students from all university disciplines interested in live theatre as a performance art in the 21st century. Students focus on the creation of theatrical experiences through the structure and balance of a play’s components. These include text, performance, direction, design, and presentational space. The plays studied within the course address many social issues of contemporary society. Attendance of live theatrical performances is an integral part of the course structure.

    ENG 231 The History of English Lit I

    A general survey and analysis of selected works from the beginnings of English literature to the present, delineating general historical patterns that provide a foundation for subsequent study. 231 starts with the Middle Ages and goes through the eighteenth century; 232 begins with the Romantic movement and closes with the moderns. Covers a broad range of materials, also pauses at regular intervals to consider individual works in depth.

    ENG 235 American Literature I

    Reading in works by major authors from the colonial period through the 19th century.

    HIST 235 Medieval World

    This course offers a broad survey of medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500), a formative period in western society known for its soaring gothic cathedrals, the culture of chivalry, church and state power struggles, the crusades, the Black Death, Dante, and the emergence of the inquisition. We will examine western Christendom in the making by tracing the growth of its central institutions alongside its encounters with others—Pagans, Jews and Muslims—as it sought to expand its horizons and borders. Readings will emphasize primary sources in translation. No previous knowledge of the Middle Ages is assumed.

    HUM 101 Classics in Conversation

    Explores fundamental human questions through great and greatly influential works of literature from the Western tradition. In small classes you will read and discuss some of the world’s most beautiful and profound poetry, drama, and prose. Essential reading for those seeking self-knowledge or insight into war and peace, nobility and baseness, heaven and hell and the here-and-now, death, forgiveness, the limits of human knowledge and power, or our restlessness and yearning and our chances of settling down and finally finding satisfaction.

    ITAL 226:Fascism, Racism, and War in Italian Literature

    This course offers an analysis of the complex legacy of Risorgimento in the 20th century Italian nation. Immediate prospects of prosperity for the young country had to face, in fact, the reality of fascism, the rise of the figure of dictator Benito Mussolini to a public myth, racism, two wars and the period called Resistenza. By braiding the reality of historical facts and the reality of artistic artifacts, namely history and literature, students learn and examine representations of some of the most complex events leading up to the republic of 1946 and a new Constitution. Mussolini¿s political speeches will be analyzed and measured against the background of a young country still in dire need of a political compass, not entirely devoid, however, of the intellectual ability to reject totalitarianism as philosopher Benedetto Croce did throughout his career. Racism and resistance to the regime as evidenced by the novels by Italo Calvino and Beppe Fenoglio will constitute some of the enlightening readings of the semester along with Primo Levi¿s reflections on his experience in the Auschwitz Lager in If This is a Man. Taught in English. Satisfies requirements for humanities, and literature.

  • Mysteries of the Cosmos

    ANTH 105 Human Evolution

    How do archaeologists use science to reconstruct the past? How do we find important archaeological sites, and how do we study them? The answers to these and related questions are explored as you learn about scientific approaches to data collection; how artifacts and other remains are studied and interpreted; as well as basic field, laboratory and dating techniques. Part of this introductory course allows you to learn how the past shapes the present, how archaeology sheds light on the past where history is absent or silent; why archaeology is relevant to contemporary society, the importance of cultural heritage; and the good, the bad and the ugly about Indiana Jones!

    CHEM 103 General Chemistry I & CHEM 113 Chem Lab

    General Chemistry I begins the exploration of the field of chemistry beginning with the atom and atomic structure and progressing to molecules, molecular bonding descriptions and interactions between molecules. The lab course provides experiential demonstrations of principles covered in lecture and is a co-requisite of the lecture course. It satisfies a science distribution course for any major. The class assumes no prior HS chemistry, but does assume familiarity with algebra. CHEM 103, taken with the laboratory course - CHEM 113, is the first course in chemistry for chemistry, environmental chemistry, and biochemistry majors. This is also the first course in the chemistry sequence required for students planning to apply to medical or dental school.

    French 242: From Earth to the Moon: Rockets, Space Travel and Imagination in Fren. and Francophone Lit. and Film

    What has compelled scientists and poets alike to look up into the sky and dream of walking on the Moon? In our search for an answer, we will travel back to the 17th century to witness the dawn of science-fiction, then traced the history of space travel through novels, films, treatises, news articles, presidential speeches and graphic novels of French and Francophone origin. We will discuss the ethics of space travel, the role of space travel in literature and in the popular imagination, and what the lure of the unknown teaches us about human nature. This class, taught in English, fulfills humanities and literature requirements.

    MATH 121 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I

    Coordinate systems, functions, graphs, one-to-one and inverse functions; composition of functions; lines and slopes; limits, continuity, maximum and minimum, derivative of a function of one variable; differentiation of polynomials, chain rule; derivatives of trigonometric functions and their inverses; implicit differentiation; antiderivative and definite integral; fundamental theorem of calculus. Not open to students who have had 111. Prerequisite: Placement.

    PHYS 103 Astronomy

    A descriptive course in astronomy and scientific cosmology intended for non-concentrators. Observing nights and field trips are an integral part of the course.

    PHYS 122 - 01 Sound & Light in Nature & Arts

    Designed for nonscience concentrators interested in music, high fidelity, vision, color, and the physical aspects of the arts.

    PSY 201 General Psychology

    Why do you do what you do? Feel what you feel? Think what you think? Psychology explores what causes human behavior -- everything from brain activity to childhood experiences, from interpersonal relations to individual motivation. General Psychology introduces students to the core aspects of human functioning: biological bases of behavior, learning, development, sensation and perception, social behavior, and cognitive processes. Additionally, this course seeks to explain why many individuals struggle with their thoughts and emotions to the point where they experience obsessive anxiety, suicidal depression, or antisocial behavior, as well as how such problems can be treated with psychotherapy.

    PSY 216 Psychology of Religion

    Religion is one of the most powerful forces driving individual experience and the larger society and world. This course will explore the psychology underpinning this force. Beginning with introductions to classic writings by William James, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and Abraham Maslow, the course will explore why people become committed to religious beliefs and the ways in which religious institutions interact with individuals and groups. The course will examine religious fanaticism and terrorism through empirical, phenomenological and sociological approaches.

    SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

    Analysis of the social forces, past, present, and future, that govern behavior and determine social life. Study of major social institutions (family, religion, government, education) and processes(social change. gender, race, class socialization).

    SOC 102 Global Social Problems and Social Justice

    Sociological analysis of selected social problems. Discussion of the causes of social problems, the processes by which they are brought to public attention, and evaluation of attempts to solve them.

    SSS 101 Introduction to Social Work

    An overview of the profession of social work within the institution of social welfare. Basic definitions, historical development, trends in social welfare and social work. May include guest lecturers. Twenty-four (24) hours of volunteer experience during the semester is required.

  • Patterns of Human Action

    ANTH 105 Human Evolution

    How do archaeologists use science to reconstruct the past? How do we find important archaeological sites, and how do we study them? The answers to these and related questions are explored as you learn about scientific approaches to data collection; how artifacts and other remains are studied and interpreted; as well as basic field, laboratory and dating techniques. Part of this introductory course allows you to learn how the past shapes the present, how archaeology sheds light on the past where history is absent or silent; why archaeology is relevant to contemporary society, the importance of cultural heritage; and the good, the bad and the ugly about Indiana Jones!

    ARPL 211 History of Architecture I

    This course explores the history of world architecture and city planning from its beginnings to the end of the Romanesque period (Carolingian). Examples will be discussed with respect to aesthetic principles, symbolism and cultural meaning, site and urban design, spatial sequence, detailing, and construction and systems technology, and in the context of their behavioral, cultural, political, religious, ecological, and economic environments.

    DR 205: Introduction to Speech Communication

    Theory and exercises in speech communication, emphasizing perception, language (verbal and nonverbal), and interaction. Students apply principles in a variety of transactions.

    ECON 100 Fundamentals of Economics

    A one semester introduction to the principles of both micro- and macroeconomics. Microeconomics topics will include the basics of supply and demand, the behavior of consumers and businesses, and how markets operate. Macroeconomic topics will include the fundamental components of gross domestic product(GDP), the problems of inflation and unemployment, the impacts of government fiscal and monetary policies, and economic growth.

    HIST 235 Medieval World

    This course offers a broad survey of medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500), a formative period in western society known for its soaring gothic cathedrals, the culture of chivalry, church and state power struggles, the crusades, the Black Death, Dante, and the emergence of the inquisition. We will examine western Christendom in the making by tracing the growth of its central institutions alongside its encounters with others—Pagans, Jews and Muslims—as it sought to expand its horizons and borders. Readings will emphasize primary sources in translation. No previous knowledge of the Middle Ages is assumed.

    HIST 257 The Making of America, 1607-1877

    The United States we know today was forged through centuries of hard-fought struggles. This course provides an overview of American History in the first 270 years. It surveys early contests between indigenous peoples and European empires, colonists' rebellion in the American Revolution, and political conundrums in the early United States. It also explains divisive economic transformations and immigration patterns, conflicts during westward expansion, women's and African Americans' demands for inclusion, reform efforts to overcome social ills, new religious awakenings, and struggles over slavery and the country's economic future. The course concludes with the accelerating centrifugal forces that brought on the Civil War, and how Americans began rebuilding the fractured nation into a new society.

    Marketing 359: Fashion Marketing

    Fashion Marketing (MKT 359) will begin with an introduction to fashion in the human experience, including a brief history of clothing, a survey of worldwide notions of beauty, the psychology of color, and a roadmap to the garment industry. The course will be an intensive study of the principles of marketing as applied to fashion, consumer behavior, ethics, and an exploration of digital marketing including the rising importance of social media.

    MATH 114 Probability and Statistics

    Designed for students in the social sciences, to acquaint them with the techniques of elementary statistics. Emphasizes computation and interpretation of data. Topics include calculation and graphing methods, measures of central tendency, measures of variation, measures of association and correlation; sampling and hypothesis testing.

    MATH 168 Mathematics in the Modern World

    Intended for liberal arts students. Explores mathematical ideas and current applications of these ideas. Topics include mathematical applications in the management sciences and social sciences and applications of geometry to physics, astronomy, chemistry, and biology.

    MATH 175 Mathematics in Politics

    This course, intended for liberal arts students, explores the mathematics involved in political concepts and applications. Topics include social choice, voting procedures and their inherent paradoxes, contributions of Arrow and Codorcet; yes/no voting and the Banzhaf and Shapley-Shubik power indices; apportionment of the House of Representatives relating the procedures of Hamilton, Jefferson, Adams, Webster and Hill-Huntington and their inherent paradoxes; fair division, including cake-cutting and inheritance division procedures.

    POL 111 Introduction to American Government

    An introduction to the basic institutions and principles of American government with particular attention to constitutional foundations, historical development, and the linkages between those institutions and the public.

    PSY 201 General Psychology

    Why do you do what you do? Feel what you feel? Think what you think? Psychology explores what causes human behavior -- everything from brain activity to childhood experiences, from interpersonal relations to individual motivation. General Psychology introduces students to the core aspects of human functioning: biological bases of behavior, learning, development, sensation and perception, social behavior, and cognitive processes. Additionally, this course seeks to explain why many individuals struggle with their thoughts and emotions to the point where they experience obsessive anxiety, suicidal depression, or antisocial behavior, as well as how such problems can be treated with psychotherapy.

    PSY 216 Psychology of Religion

    Religion is one of the most powerful forces driving individual experience and the larger society and world. This course will explore the psychology underpinning this force. Beginning with introductions to classic writings by William James, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and Abraham Maslow, the course will explore why people become committed to religious beliefs and the ways in which religious institutions interact with individuals and groups. The course will examine religious fanaticism and terrorism through empirical, phenomenological and sociological approaches.

    SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

    Analysis of the social forces, past, present, and future, that govern behavior and determine social life. Study of major social institutions (family, religion, government, education) and processes(social change. gender, race, class socialization).

    SOC 102 Global Social Problems and Social Justice

    Sociological analysis of selected social problems. Discussion of the causes of social problems, the processes by which they are brought to public attention, and evaluation of attempts to solve them.

    SOC 205: Sociology of Crime and Justice

    Analysis of causes and consequences of criminal behavior. Exploration of the racial, socioeconomic, and other factors influencing the definition, treatment, and amelioration of criminal behavior.

    SOC 317: Criminology

    Analysis of theoretical explanations of why people commit crime and the development of laws to control criminal behavior and deviant practices. Criminal justice detection methods and early prevention strategies will be covered in depth.

    SOC 320 Terrorism and Counter Terrorism

    This course introduces students to the historical and current terrorist threats at both national and international levels. Terrorists organizations, their motivations, strategies, tactics and targets will be discussed. The various national and international counter terrorism measures past and present will also be presented in the course.

    SSS 101 Introduction to Social Work

    An overview of the profession of social work within the institution of social welfare. Basic definitions, historical development, trends in social welfare and social work. May include guest lecturers. Twenty-four (24) hours of volunteer experience during the semester is required.

  • Contempory Issues

    ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultures in a Global Society

    An ideal course for first year students, this course helps you understand your place in the world. Students think critically and systematically about the diversity of people and cultures. As we read about and discuss contemporary individuals in their families and societies, we consider how lives are affected by media images and information, transnational markets, consumer desires, global ecology, conflicting aspirations, religious revivals, and rewritten histories. Through a global perspective, we look at individuals in society by learning about their worldviews, ways of making a living, social arrangements, and belief systems. It establishes the foundations for ANTH 200 and 201, including concepts and methods of cultural anthropology, especially the concept of culture and the logic and practice of fieldwork.

    BIO 103: General Biology I

    An examination of the human body in health and disease. After examining the normal physiology of the body, the processes and symptoms of a variety of diseases will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the factors responsible for these diseases and their prevention. For non-concentrators only. Note: Biology 103 and 104 may be taken in any order.

    CSC 106 Introduction to Computer Programming for non-Engineers

    Students will be provided with the basic knowledge and practical experience to understand computer programming. This will be accomplished by having the students learn the Python programming language. The course is intended to be beneficial to non-technical majors with little to no knowledge of computer programming but may also be useful to students with some programming experience that would simply like to learn Python. The course will help form a mental framework for students so they can not only understand some of the basic tools used by computer scientists but also how to use those tools themselves. By taking the course, students will understand basic computer science concepts such as variables, expressions, statements, functions, conditionals, recursion, strings and more. These concepts will be developed in a deep and significant way as students create their own programs using the popular and freely available Python programming language.

    ECON 100 Fundamentals of Economics

    A one semester introduction to the principles of both micro- and macroeconomics. Microeconomics topics will include the basics of supply and demand, the behavior of consumers and businesses, and how markets operate. Macroeconomic topics will include the fundamental components of gross domestic product(GDP), the problems of inflation and unemployment, the impacts of government fiscal and monetary policies, and economic growth.

    EDUC 101 Introduction to Teaching (1 credit)

    A one-credit course for any student interested in becoming an early childhood, elementary, or secondary school teacher, or interested in exploring courses available through the Education Studies program. Introduces students to the Catholic University Teacher Education Program's philosophy and requirements. Course content designed to help students clarify whether they have the disposition to be good teachers and want to consider teaching as a career goal.

    Management 118 Tools and Foundations for the Vocation of Business (Department Consent is Required)

    This course is designed for students who are undecided or haven¿t discovered their passion yet. It is for those interested in discerning in what direction to take their life. You will learn how to find what you want out of life, what your strengths and weaknesses are, and how you can apply them to your career. What do I have to offer to the world? How do I find my professional vocation? How do I decide what major to choose? How do I decide on a career? How is business a force for good? How do I start a business? How do I use a computer for business? We will explore these and many other questions through lectures, lab classes, and various projects. (Fall and Spring)

    MATH 168 Mathematics in the Modern World

    Intended for liberal arts students. Explores mathematical ideas and current applications of these ideas. Topics include mathematical applications in the management sciences and social sciences and applications of geometry to physics, astronomy, chemistry, and biology.

    MATH 175 Mathematics in Politics

    This course, intended for liberal arts students, explores the mathematics involved in political concepts and applications. Topics include social choice, voting procedures and their inherent paradoxes, contributions of Arrow and Codorcet; yes/no voting and the Banzhaf and Shapley-Shubik power indices; apportionment of the House of Representatives relating the procedures of Hamilton, Jefferson, Adams, Webster and Hill-Huntington and their inherent paradoxes; fair division, including cake-cutting and inheritance division procedures.

    MDIA 201 Intro to Media Studies

    Students learn basic media literacy by developing conceptual tools to think critically about cinema, television, advertising, print journalism, the internet, etc. The course focuses on the process of reading media texts from distinct rhetorical perspectives--in terms of a text's form and in terms of its relationships to audiences, authors, and the real world--in order to explore how the mass media shape and convey meaning.

    POL 111 Introduction to American Government

    An introduction to the basic institutions and principles of American government with particular attention to constitutional foundations, historical development, and the linkages between those institutions and the public.

    POL 202 European Politics

    European Politics is designed to help students develop a better understanding of political institutions, actors and processes, both within selected European national states as well as in the context of European Union integration. In addition, the course will focus on prominent issues of contention and areas of cooperation, also as they relate to Europe¿s role in global affairs.

    POL 220: Introduction to Law & Politics

    Topics include the nature and function of law, theories of justice, constitutionalism, the Supreme Court and legal reasoning, and varieties of law, such as statutory and regulatory law, common and civil law, and public and private law. American Government.

    PSY 216 Psychology of Religion

    Religion is one of the most powerful forces driving individual experience and the larger society and world. This course will explore the psychology underpinning this force. Beginning with introductions to classic writings by William James, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and Abraham Maslow, the course will explore why people become committed to religious beliefs and the ways in which religious institutions interact with individuals and groups. The course will examine religious fanaticism and terrorism through empirical, phenomenological and sociological approaches.

    PSY 261 Psychology and the Media

    Are Instagram and Snapchat ruining social relationships? Is multitasking changing brain functioning? Do violent video games make children into killers? How badly do TV and movies inaccurately portray mental illness? This course explores the ever-changing relationship between the field of psychology and mass media. The course will explore how media images, and technological advances in general, have impacted our culture, the field of psychology, and the development of mental illness. In addition, the course examines how the media portrays specific mental disorders, the roles of psychologists, and psychotherapy.

    SOC 102 Global Social Problems and Social Justice

    Sociological analysis of selected social problems. Discussion of the causes of social problems, the processes by which they are brought to public attention, and evaluation of attempts to solve them.

    SOC 320 Terrorism and Counter Terrorism

    This course introduces students to the historical and current terrorist threats at both national and international levels. Terrorists organizations, their motivations, strategies, tactics and targets will be discussed. The various national and international counter terrorism measures past and present will also be presented in the course.

    SSS 101 Introduction to Social Work

    An overview of the profession of social work within the institution of social welfare. Basic definitions, historical development, trends in social welfare and social work. May include guest lecturers. Twenty-four (24) hours of volunteer experience during the semester is required.

  • The Human Mind

    ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultures in a Global Society

    An ideal course for first year students, this course helps you understand your place in the world. Students think critically and systematically about the diversity of people and cultures. As we read about and discuss contemporary individuals in their families and societies, we consider how lives are affected by media images and information, transnational markets, consumer desires, global ecology, conflicting aspirations, religious revivals, and rewritten histories. Through a global perspective, we look at individuals in society by learning about their worldviews, ways of making a living, social arrangements, and belief systems. It establishes the foundations for ANTH 200 and 201, including concepts and methods of cultural anthropology, especially the concept of culture and the logic and practice of fieldwork.

    BIO 103: General Biology I

    An examination of the human body in health and disease. After examining the normal physiology of the body, the processes and symptoms of a variety of diseases will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the factors responsible for these diseases and their prevention. For non-concentrators only. Note: Biology 103 and 104 may be taken in any order.

    DR 206 Acting I

    Self discovery. Acting I is an introduction to the basic elements of the Stanislavski system. Students train in exercises to develop concentration, imagination and life observation. Improvisations will encourage physical freedom and a sense of truth. This beginning work will teach stage craft, "moment to moment" spontaneity and a specific approach to researching and rehearsing a contemporary scene and monologue.

    EDUC 101 Introduction to Teaching (1 credit)

    A one-credit course for any student interested in becoming an early childhood, elementary, or secondary school teacher, or interested in exploring courses available through the Education Studies program. Introduces students to the Catholic University Teacher Education Program's philosophy and requirements. Course content designed to help students clarify whether they have the disposition to be good teachers and want to consider teaching as a career goal.

    HUM 101 Classics in Conversation

    Explores fundamental human questions through great and greatly influential works of literature from the Western tradition. In small classes you will read and discuss some of the world’s most beautiful and profound poetry, drama, and prose. Essential reading for those seeking self-knowledge or insight into war and peace, nobility and baseness, heaven and hell and the here-and-now, death, forgiveness, the limits of human knowledge and power, or our restlessness and yearning and our chances of settling down and finally finding satisfaction.

    MATH 187 Introduction to Mathematical Thought

    Intended for liberal arts students. Topics chosen from among: basic logic, number theory, infinite sets and cardinal numbers, symmetry and finite groups, graph theory and polyhedra, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, and others.

    PSY 201 General Psychology

    Why do you do what you do? Feel what you feel? Think what you think? Psychology explores what causes human behavior -- everything from brain activity to childhood experiences, from interpersonal relations to individual motivation. General Psychology introduces students to the core aspects of human functioning: biological bases of behavior, learning, development, sensation and perception, social behavior, and cognitive processes. Additionally, this course seeks to explain why many individuals struggle with their thoughts and emotions to the point where they experience obsessive anxiety, suicidal depression, or antisocial behavior, as well as how such problems can be treated with psychotherapy.

    PSY 216 Psychology of Religion

    Religion is one of the most powerful forces driving individual experience and the larger society and world. This course will explore the psychology underpinning this force. Beginning with introductions to classic writings by William James, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and Abraham Maslow, the course will explore why people become committed to religious beliefs and the ways in which religious institutions interact with individuals and groups. The course will examine religious fanaticism and terrorism through empirical, phenomenological and sociological approaches.

    PSY 309 Psychology of Adolescence

    Reviews theories and research on the psychological and biological changes of adolescence; changing relationships with parents; developing friendships and intimacy; changes in cognitive development, etc. Review of clinical disorders common in adolescence (depression, eating disorders, delinquency, substance abuse). Stresses societal-cultural influences on pubertal and adolescent development.

    PSY 313: Leadership in Organizations

    Leadership in Organizations examines what makes an effective leader, balancing theory and practice as it surveys major theories and research on leadership and managerial effectiveness in formal organizations. Using real-world examples, we will explore leadership traits, skills, and behavior, the role of leadership in groups and teams, and the ethical use of power and influence. Additionally, we will examine how effective leaders improve the practice of management, change and innovation, and strategic leadership.

    SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

    Analysis of the social forces, past, present, and future, that govern behavior and determine social life. Study of major social institutions (family, religion, government, education) and processes(social change. gender, race, class socialization).

    SOC 102 Global Social Problems and Social Justice

    Sociological analysis of selected social problems. Discussion of the causes of social problems, the processes by which they are brought to public attention, and evaluation of attempts to solve them.

  • Arrange Alphabetically

    ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology: Cultures in a Global Society

    An ideal course for first year students, this course helps you understand your place in the world. Students think critically and systematically about the diversity of people and cultures. As we read about and discuss contemporary individuals in their families and societies, we consider how lives are affected by media images and information, transnational markets, consumer desires, global ecology, conflicting aspirations, religious revivals, and rewritten histories. Through a global perspective, we look at individuals in society by learning about their worldviews, ways of making a living, social arrangements, and belief systems. It establishes the foundations for ANTH 200 and 201, including concepts and methods of cultural anthropology, especially the concept of culture and the logic and practice of fieldwork.

    ANTH 105 Human Evolution

    How do archaeologists use science to reconstruct the past? How do we find important archaeological sites, and how do we study them? The answers to these and related questions are explored as you learn about scientific approaches to data collection; how artifacts and other remains are studied and interpreted; as well as basic field, laboratory and dating techniques. Part of this introductory course allows you to learn how the past shapes the present, how archaeology sheds light on the past where history is absent or silent; why archaeology is relevant to contemporary society, the importance of cultural heritage; and the good, the bad and the ugly about Indiana Jones!

    ANTH 108 Introduction to Archeology

    As an introduction to scientific Human Evolution this course focuses on how  Homo sapiens sapiens developed biologically and culturally using the latest scientific evidence from genetics, comparisons with non-human primates and the incredible fossil and archaeological record of our evolution.

    The class begins with the interesting history of evolutionary thinking from a diverse group of Europeans that provided the basic ideas of our modern scientific approach. Next, we consider heredity, how we acquire our unique set of biological traits. To understand heredity, students are introduced to cell and population genetics. In an effort to explain our unique behavioral developments, students consider living non-human primates as our closest ancestors. Lastly, the course traces the fascinating fossil and archaeological evidence of our earliest ancestors and tracks the rapid spread of  Homo sapiens across the globe.

    ANTH 200: Core Perspectives in Anthropology

    Introduces core perspectives that distinguish anthropological approaches, their relation to other social and natural sciences, to philosophy and the humanities, and how they apply across different theories about meaning, structure, and agency in human social life and culture. Fall semesters.

    ANTH 202: Sex and Culture in Modern World.

    This course examines sex and gender issues in societies around the world that have been brought into the web of the modern world. It focuses on the creation, maintenance, and change of cultural differences in gender; the work of culture in sexuality; and equality and inequality between the sexes in different societies. It examines our own commonsense understanding and practices, and the various critical stances of "feminism."

    ANTH 214: Anthropology of Food

    With almost 6 billion people to feed and unprecedented levels of human impact on the environment, many cultural, social, and environmental questions surround the supply of food. Are there ethical and non-ethical ways to produce food? How does food production relate to a healthy environment? What happens to food as it moves from the farmer to the dinner plate? How does food become an expression of our social selves? This course uses an anthropological perspective to assess these and related questions in the production, processing and consumption of food.

    ANTH 240:Politics of the Past: An Introduction to Cultural Heritage Studies

    What makes the past meaningful to individuals, communities, nations, and the world? How is cultural heritage mobilized to build identity, social cohesion, develop tourist markets, encourage financial investment, and stake political claims? This course critically examines western relationships to the past tied to property and rooted in the colonial drive to plunder, collect, and catalogue, and how non-Western heritage frameworks both complement and challenge this conception. In addition to the tangible material remains of the past, the course also explores heritage¿s `intangible¿ dimensions, from folklore, music, dance and festivals to language, knowledge, and even landscapes. The focus is on how cultural heritage is embedded in everyday life and how the past is political, continuing to live on and be creatively reinterpreted in the present.

    ANTH 254:Ancient Cultures of South America

    ARAB 101: Introduction to Modern Standard Arabic

    This introduction course to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) uses video-based course materials and focuses on developing proficiency in the standard written Arabic language, as well as formal spoken Arabic understood by educated speakers across the Arab world. The course begins with learning the script and the sound system using Alf-Baa as a core text. The book simultaneously introduces vocabulary so that students can begin performing dialogues and other activities from the first week. After the alphabet is covered, students complete the first chapters of Al-Kitaab Part 1 in which more grammar and vocabulary are introduced at a faster rate to build the foundation for general communicative competence and greater cultural awareness.

    ARPL 101 Introduction to Architecture

    This course introduces students to the world of design and architecture, its concepts, theory, language, practice, and ethics, and to associated and related fields (such as interior, landscape, graphic, and industrial design, to planning, construction, and development). It also introduces them to the world of the architectural student and intern and to management of the demands it will make of them. Students will learn to raise their powers of observation and design awareness, and increase their sensitivity toward the quality of the designed environment. (This course counts as a general elective in the School of Arts and Sciences; it does not fulfill a humanities distribution requirement.)

    ARPL 211 History of Architecture I

    This course explores the history of world architecture and city planning from its beginnings to the end of the Romanesque period (Carolingian). Examples will be discussed with respect to aesthetic principles, symbolism and cultural meaning, site and urban design, spatial sequence, detailing, and construction and systems technology, and in the context of their behavioral, cultural, political, religious, ecological, and economic environments.

    ART 101 Fundamentals of Design I

    Introductory studio art course; primary goal is the development of an awareness and appreciation of the visual experience and of the limitless possibilities for making things of beauty and delight. Learning based largely on a conscious amassing of visual experiences and the development of seeing, upon which, eventually, to realize one's own visual language and visual value judgments. Studio exercises and lectures consider two-dimensional work and color.

    ART 201 Drawing and Composition I

    Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Studio, six hours per week. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account.

    ART 202 Drawing and Composition II

    Exploration of drawing as an art form for the novice or for those with some experience. Emphasis on the development of visual awareness, appreciation, and discrimination. Various media and techniques employed in drawing from life and in varied visual exercises. Studio, six hours per week. 201 is not prerequisite to 202. Students enrolled in this course will have a course fee assessed to their student account.

    ART 211 History of Art: Prehistory to the Middle Ages

    A survey of Western art from prehistory to the Middle Ages. Assists the student in a visual and critical understanding of the art of the past. The Western tradition investigated, with emphasis on such art forms as sculpture, painting, and architecture.

    ART 325 Rococo to Romanticism

    Examines the Neoclassical and Romantic movements in Western art and culture from 1750 to 1850. Charts the impact of the Academie, the role of classical art and its early tradition, and the rise of the avant garde. Artists to be studied include David, Goya, Gericault, Delacroix, Constable, Turner and Friedrich.

    ART 346 Art, Religion and Magic in Renaissance and Baroque Italy

    This course explores Renaissance and Baroque beliefs in the power of images to transform their beholders. The idea that images might produce profound mental and physical changes in viewers was widely articulated in the period 1450 to 1650. They might soothe a troubled soul, create healthy and beautiful bodies, and mitigate physical suffering. This course will consider varied types of images, including miraculous images, and magical images, their functions and their efficacy. How did images heal the sick, cheer distressed or melancholic beholders, or transform the physical appearance of their beholders? To what extent did the expectations of efficacy attaching to paintings differ from other forms of talismanic images? Among the questions this course will consider: how did artists approach the creation of images with such expectations in mind? And knowing that their paintings were supposed to transform, how did they address specific audiences (male vs. female, for example)?

    ASL 101 American Sign Language I

    An introductory course in American Sign Language as developed and used by the Deaf community in most areas of North America. It brings students into communication, followed by instruction and practice in basic vocabulary, syntax, fingerspelling, grammatical non-manual signals, sentence structure, elementary conversation, and literature. In addition, the course provides cultural knowledge and various issues raised by examining ASL and the understanding of Deaf community.

    BIO 103: General Biology I

    An examination of the human body in health and disease. After examining the normal physiology of the body, the processes and symptoms of a variety of diseases will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the factors responsible for these diseases and their prevention. For non-concentrators only. Note: Biology 103 and 104 may be taken in any order.

    CHEM 103 General Chemistry I & CHEM 113 Chem Lab

    General Chemistry I begins the exploration of the field of chemistry beginning with the atom and atomic structure and progressing to molecules, molecular bonding descriptions and interactions between molecules. The lab course provides experiential demonstrations of principles covered in lecture and is a co-requisite of the lecture course. It satisfies a science distribution course for any major. The class assumes no prior HS chemistry, but does assume familiarity with algebra. CHEM 103, taken with the laboratory course - CHEM 113, is the first course in chemistry for chemistry, environmental chemistry, and biochemistry majors. This is also the first course in the chemistry sequence required for students planning to apply to medical or dental school.

    CHN 101: Beginning Mandarin Chinese I

    This beginner's course is designed for students who desire to study Chinese systematically. The course uses video-based material to introduce the language in real-life settings. Pinyin and simplified characters are used. Accurate pronunciation, tones, and grammatical expressions are the main focuses for this semester.

    CLAS 105 Reading the Greeks

    CLAS 211 Greek and Roman Mythology

    The myths of the Greeks and Romans are ways of thinking about the relationship between man and the gods, the forces of nature, and the universe. This course invites you to think about familiar stories in new ways, and to learn new stories, too. Subjects studied will include creation myths, the divinities and heroes, and the stories of the Trojan War. Excerpts from ancient literature and examples from ancient art help to show how ancient peoples represented and talked about their beliefs.

    CSC 104 Introduction to Computers I

    Elementary programming in a high-level language intended for liberal arts majors who want an introduction to computing history, computer concepts, hardware, software, and application software such as operating systems, graphics, word processing, databases and spreadsheets. Introduces general problem-solving techniques including the concepts of step-wise refinement applied to the development of algorithms.

    CSC 106 Introduction to Computer Programming for non-Engineers

    Students will be provided with the basic knowledge and practical experience to understand computer programming. This will be accomplished by having the students learn the Python programming language. The course is intended to be beneficial to non-technical majors with little to no knowledge of computer programming but may also be useful to students with some programming experience that would simply like to learn Python. The course will help form a mental framework for students so they can not only understand some of the basic tools used by computer scientists but also how to use those tools themselves. By taking the course, students will understand basic computer science concepts such as variables, expressions, statements, functions, conditionals, recursion, strings and more. These concepts will be developed in a deep and significant way as students create their own programs using the popular and freely available Python programming language.

    DR 101 Theater I

    Introduction to Drama examines how language can be manipulated to enhance the depth and understanding of human communication through live performance. The course focuses on how that communication can be used, modified, and reinforced as a medium of artistic expression. This is an introductory humanities course designed for students from all university disciplines interested in live theatre as a performance art in the 21st century. Students focus on the creation of theatrical experiences through the structure and balance of a play’s components. These include text, performance, direction, design, and presentational space. The plays studied within the course address many social issues of contemporary society. Attendance of live theatrical performances is an integral part of the course structure.

    DR 102: Introduction to the Alexander Technique

    This class is an introduction to the principles of the Alexander Technique. The course is designed for performers and anyone else who want to free their bodies for maximum efficiency for self-expression. It will enable the student to identify harmful habits that interfere with their freedom of movement and balance. Students will learn to release bodily tension and move with more ease and poise thus becoming more conscious and accountable for the way they use their bodies. Classwork includes understanding Alexander's principles, simple anatomy, developmental movement, breathing, relaxation techniques, and class presentations. Course book required first day of class.

    DR 205: Introduction to Speech Communication

    Theory and exercises in speech communication, emphasizing perception, language (verbal and nonverbal), and interaction. Students apply principles in a variety of transactions.

    DR 206 Acting I

    Self discovery. Acting I is an introduction to the basic elements of the Stanislavski system. Students train in exercises to develop concentration, imagination and life observation. Improvisations will encourage physical freedom and a sense of truth. This beginning work will teach stage craft, "moment to moment" spontaneity and a specific approach to researching and rehearsing a contemporary scene and monologue.

    ECON 100 Fundamentals of Economics

    A one semester introduction to the principles of both micro- and macroeconomics. Microeconomics topics will include the basics of supply and demand, the behavior of consumers and businesses, and how markets operate. Macroeconomic topics will include the fundamental components of gross domestic product(GDP), the problems of inflation and unemployment, the impacts of government fiscal and monetary policies, and economic growth.

    EDUC 101 Introduction to Teaching (1 credit)

    A one-credit course for any student interested in becoming an early childhood, elementary, or secondary school teacher, or interested in exploring courses available through the Education Studies program. Introduces students to the Catholic University Teacher Education Program's philosophy and requirements. Course content designed to help students clarify whether they have the disposition to be good teachers and want to consider teaching as a career goal.

    ENG 231 The History of English Lit I

    A general survey and analysis of selected works from the beginnings of English literature to the present, delineating general historical patterns that provide a foundation for subsequent study. The course starts with the Middle Ages and goes through the eighteenth century.

    ENG 235 American Literature I

    This course surveys major authors of American literature from the colonial period through the end of the 19th century. Representative writers include Franklin, Poe, Thoreau, Melville, Douglass, Whitman, Dickinson, and Mark Twain. Works are examined in aesthetic and cultural contexts, including Puritanism, nation-building and American identity, Romanticism, slavery and reform, women's roles, and American humor.

    French 242: From Earth to the Moon: Rockets, Space Travel and Imagination in Fren. and Francophone Lit. and Film

    What has compelled scientists and poets alike to look up into the sky and dream of walking on the Moon? In our search for an answer, we will travel back to the 17th century to witness the dawn of science-fiction, then traced the history of space travel through novels, films, treatises, news articles, presidential speeches and graphic novels of French and Francophone origin. We will discuss the ethics of space travel, the role of space travel in literature and in the popular imagination, and what the lure of the unknown teaches us about human nature. This class, taught in English, fulfills humanities and literature requirements.

    HIST 142 - The Mongol Empire: Fire and Blood, Silk and Love across Eurasia

    HIST 235 Medieval World

    This course offers a broad survey of medieval Europe (ca. 500-1500), a formative period in western society known for its soaring gothic cathedrals, the culture of chivalry, church and state power struggles, the crusades, the Black Death, Dante, and the emergence of the inquisition. We will examine western Christendom in the making by tracing the growth of its central institutions alongside its encounters with others—Pagans, Jews and Muslims—as it sought to expand its horizons and borders. Readings will emphasize primary sources in translation. No previous knowledge of the Middle Ages is assumed.

    HIST 257 The Making of America, 1607-1877

    The United States we know today was forged through centuries of hard-fought struggles. This course provides an overview of American History in the first 270 years. It surveys early contests between indigenous peoples and European empires, colonists' rebellion in the American Revolution, and political conundrums in the early United States. It also explains divisive economic transformations and immigration patterns, conflicts during westward expansion, women's and African Americans' demands for inclusion, reform efforts to overcome social ills, new religious awakenings, and struggles over slavery and the country's economic future. The course concludes with the accelerating centrifugal forces that brought on the Civil War, and how Americans began rebuilding the fractured nation into a new society.

    HUM 101 Classics in Conversation

    Explores fundamental human questions through great and greatly influential works of literature from the Western tradition. In small classes you will read and discuss some of the world’s most beautiful and profound poetry, drama, and prose. Essential reading for those seeking self-knowledge or insight into war and peace, nobility and baseness, heaven and hell and the here-and-now, death, forgiveness, the limits of human knowledge and power, or our restlessness and yearning and our chances of settling down and finally finding satisfaction.

    IRSH 101: Irish Language and Culture I

    Introduction to the Irish language and to Irish culture. There will be a second semester course offered in the spring. Irish language and culture courses do not fulfill the university’s language requirement. They present an introduction to Irish culture through the Irish (Celtic) language. No prerequisites.

    ITAL 220:The Splendor of Rome in Literature & Film

    Famous twins Romulus and Remus were merely the first two artists who shaped Rome, one of the most beautiful, complex, and recounted cities in the world! The Eternal City, as it is often referred to, is the physical embodiment of a complex identity as it the point of reference for many artists and travelers who have journeyed and relentlessly tried to construct images for its beauty. During this virtual walk through Rome's (particularly modern) history, students will encounter works revealing the singular allure of the space of the city that is twice a capital. From the work of world-renown directors Federico Fellini and Vittorio De Sica to that of writers Alberto Moravia and Amara Lakhous, students will enjoy the dolce vita (sweet life) and the cultural import of Rome in poetry, in music, in the visual arts, and cinema. Taught in English. Same as MDIA 307. Satisfies requirements for HUM and LIT.

    ITAL 226:Fascism, Racism, and War in Italian Literature

    This course offers an analysis of the complex legacy of Risorgimento in the 20th century Italian nation. Immediate prospects of prosperity for the young country had to face, in fact, the reality of fascism, the rise of the figure of dictator Benito Mussolini to a public myth, racism, two wars and the period called Resistenza. By braiding the reality of historical facts and the reality of artistic artifacts, namely history and literature, students learn and examine representations of some of the most complex events leading up to the republic of 1946 and a new Constitution. Mussolini¿s political speeches will be analyzed and measured against the background of a young country still in dire need of a political compass, not entirely devoid, however, of the intellectual ability to reject totalitarianism as philosopher Benedetto Croce did throughout his career. Racism and resistance to the regime as evidenced by the novels by Italo Calvino and Beppe Fenoglio will constitute some of the enlightening readings of the semester along with Primo Levi¿s reflections on his experience in the Auschwitz Lager in If This is a Man. Taught in English. Satisfies requirements for humanities, and literature.

    Management 118 Tools and Foundations for the Vocation of Business (Department Consent is Required)

    This course is designed for students who are undecided or haven¿t discovered their passion yet. It is for those interested in discerning in what direction to take their life. You will learn how to find what you want out of life, what your strengths and weaknesses are, and how you can apply them to your career. What do I have to offer to the world? How do I find my professional vocation? How do I decide what major to choose? How do I decide on a career? How is business a force for good? How do I start a business? How do I use a computer for business? We will explore these and many other questions through lectures, lab classes, and various projects. (Fall and Spring)

    Marketing 359: Fashion Marketing

    Fashion Marketing (MKT 359) will begin with an introduction to fashion in the human experience, including a brief history of clothing, a survey of worldwide notions of beauty, the psychology of color, and a roadmap to the garment industry. The course will be an intensive study of the principles of marketing as applied to fashion, consumer behavior, ethics, and an exploration of digital marketing

    MATH 111 Calculus for Social-Life Sciences I

    Functions and their graphs; linear functions; functional models; derivative, rate of change and marginal analysis; approximation by differentials; chain rule, implicit differentiation and higher-order derivatives; curve sketching: relative extrema, concavity; absolute extrema; exponential functions and natural logarithms and their derivatives; compound interest. Not open to students who have had 121. Prerequisite: Placement.

    MATH 112 Calculus for Social-Life Sciences II

    The concept of antiderivative; integration by substitution, by parts, and by use of tables; definite integral; area under a curve; applications to business and economics; definite integral as the limit of a sum; improper integrals; probability density; numerical integration; linear and separable differential equations; functions of several variables, partial derivatives, chain rule and total differential; relative extrema; Lagrange multiplier methods; the least square approximation. Not open to students who have had 122. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in 111.

    MATH 114 Probability and Statistics

    Designed for students in the social sciences, to acquaint them with the techniques of elementary statistics. Emphasizes computation and interpretation of data. Topics include calculation and graphing methods, measures of central tendency, measures of variation, measures of association and correlation; sampling and hypothesis testing.

    MATH 121 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I

    Coordinate systems, functions, graphs, one-to-one and inverse functions; composition of functions; lines and slopes; limits, continuity, maximum and minimum, derivative of a function of one variable; differentiation of polynomials, chain rule; derivatives of trigonometric functions and their inverses; implicit differentiation; antiderivative and definite integral; fundamental theorem of calculus. Not open to students who have had 111. Prerequisite: Placement.

    MATH 168 Mathematics in the Modern World

    Intended for liberal arts students. Explores mathematical ideas and current applications of these ideas. Topics include mathematical applications in the management sciences and social sciences and applications of geometry to physics, astronomy, chemistry, and biology.

    MATH 175 Mathematics in Politics

    This course, intended for liberal arts students, explores the mathematics involved in political concepts and applications. Topics include social choice, voting procedures and their inherent paradoxes, contributions of Arrow and Codorcet; yes/no voting and the Banzhaf and Shapley-Shubik power indices; apportionment of the House of Representatives relating the procedures of Hamilton, Jefferson, Adams, Webster and Hill-Huntington and their inherent paradoxes; fair division, including cake-cutting and inheritance division procedures.

    MATH 187 Introduction to Mathematical Thought

    Intended for liberal arts students. Topics chosen from among: basic logic, number theory, infinite sets and cardinal numbers, symmetry and finite groups, graph theory and polyhedra, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, and others.

    MDIA 201 Intro to Media Studies

    Students learn basic media literacy by developing conceptual tools to think critically about cinema, television, advertising, print journalism, the internet, etc. The course focuses on the process of reading media texts from distinct rhetorical perspectives--in terms of a text's form and in terms of its relationships to audiences, authors, and the real world--in order to explore how the mass media shape and convey meaning.

    PHYS 103 Astronomy

    A descriptive course in astronomy and scientific cosmology intended for non-concentrators. Observing nights and field trips are an integral part of the course.

    PHYS 122 - 01 Sound & Light in Nature & Arts

    Designed for nonscience concentrators interested in music, high fidelity, vision, color, and the physical aspects of the arts.

    POL 111 Introduction to American Government

    An introduction to the basic institutions and principles of American government with particular attention to constitutional foundations, historical development, and the linkages between those institutions and the public.

    POL 112 Introduction to Comparative Politics

    An introduction to the basic principles of government as exemplified by the developed countries of Europe, the post-communist states of Eastern Europe, and developing countries elsewhere. Depending on the instructor, will examine themes of democratization, institutional design (presidential vs. Parliamentary systems, electoral systems), parties and party systems, and/or in the impact of social and economic change on the conduct and evolution of modern political systems. Required.

    POL 202 European Politics

    European Politics is designed to help students develop a better understanding of political institutions, actors and processes, both within selected European national states as well as in the context of European Union integration. In addition, the course will focus on prominent issues of contention and areas of cooperation, also as they relate to Europe¿s role in global affairs.

    POL 220: Introduction to Law & Politics

    Topics include the nature and function of law, theories of justice, constitutionalism, the Supreme Court and legal reasoning, and varieties of law, such as statutory and regulatory law, common and civil law, and public and private law. American Government.

    PSY 101 Social Science Foundation (Department Consent is Required)

    PSY 201 General Psychology

    Why do you do what you do? Feel what you feel? Think what you think? Psychology explores what causes human behavior -- everything from brain activity to childhood experiences, from interpersonal relations to individual motivation. General Psychology introduces students to the core aspects of human functioning: biological bases of behavior, learning, development, sensation and perception, social behavior, and cognitive processes. Additionally, this course seeks to explain why many individuals struggle with their thoughts and emotions to the point where they experience obsessive anxiety, suicidal depression, or antisocial behavior, as well as how such problems can be treated with psychotherapy.

    PSY 216 Psychology of Religion

    Religion is one of the most powerful forces driving individual experience and the larger society and world. This course will explore the psychology underpinning this force. Beginning with introductions to classic writings by William James, Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and Abraham Maslow, the course will explore why people become committed to religious beliefs and the ways in which religious institutions interact with individuals and groups. The course will examine religious fanaticism and terrorism through empirical, phenomenological and sociological approaches.

    PSY 261 Psychology and the Media

    Are Instagram and Snapchat ruining social relationships? Is multitasking changing brain functioning? Do violent video games make children into killers? How badly do TV and movies inaccurately portray mental illness? This course explores the ever-changing relationship between the field of psychology and mass media. The course will explore how media images, and technological advances in general, have impacted our culture, the field of psychology, and the development of mental illness. In addition, the course examines how the media portrays specific mental disorders, the roles of psychologists, and psychotherapy.

    PSY 309 Psychology of Adolescence

    Reviews theories and research on the psychological and biological changes of adolescence; changing relationships with parents; developing friendships and intimacy; changes in cognitive development, etc. Review of clinical disorders common in adolescence (depression, eating disorders, delinquency, substance abuse). Stresses societal-cultural influences on pubertal and adolescent development.

    PSY 313: Leadership in Organizations

    Leadership in Organizations examines what makes an effective leader, balancing theory and practice as it surveys major theories and research on leadership and managerial effectiveness in formal organizations. Using real-world examples, we will explore leadership traits, skills, and behavior, the role of leadership in groups and teams, and the ethical use of power and influence. Additionally, we will examine how effective leaders improve the practice of management, change and innovation, and strategic leadership.

    SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

    Analysis of the social forces, past, present, and future, that govern behavior and determine social life. Study of major social institutions (family, religion, government, education) and processes(social change. gender, race, class socialization).

    SOC 102 Global Social Problems and Social Justice

    Sociological analysis of selected social problems. Discussion of the causes of social problems, the processes by which they are brought to public attention, and evaluation of attempts to solve them.

    SOC 205: Sociology of Crime and Justice

    Analysis of causes and consequences of criminal behavior. Exploration of the racial, socioeconomic, and other factors influencing the definition, treatment, and amelioration of criminal behavior.

    SOC 317: Criminology

    Analysis of theoretical explanations of why people commit crime and the development of laws to control criminal behavior and deviant practices. Criminal justice detection methods and early prevention strategies will be covered in depth.

    SOC 320 Terrorism and Counter Terrorism

    This course introduces students to the historical and current terrorist threats at both national and international levels. Terrorists organizations, their motivations, strategies, tactics and targets will be discussed. The various national and international counter terrorism measures past and present will also be presented in the course.

    SSS 101 Introduction to Social Work

    An overview of the profession of social work within the institution of social welfare. Basic definitions, historical development, trends in social welfare and social work. May include guest lecturers. Twenty-four (24) hours of volunteer experience during the semester is required.