Are you thinking of doing an internship? Have you thought about your future and career options after you graduate?

Have you thought about how having a disability might impact things in terms of essential job functions? Your resume and cover letter? How about during the interview?

It's never too early to start. Career development does not start when you send out your first resume. It is important as a student that you are involved in your career development from the beginning of your time here at The Catholic University of America.

  • Career Timeline

    Freshman Year
    • Register with Disability Support Services
    • Schedule a one-on-one appointment with a career counselor in Center for Academic and Career Success to discuss your interests, your options, how to get started, and what to do next.
    • Discuss Disclosure and Self-Advocacy
    • Attend Workshops related to your interests
    • Take the Career Interest tests
    • Use the Center for Academic and Career Success Website
    • Narrow down your major
    • Get involved on campus
    • Get a job on campus during the year (Handshake)
    • Think about having a summer job or internship
    Sophomore Year
    • Evaluate your summer job experience and what you learned about your disability in a work setting
    • Decide on your major (if you haven’t already)
    • Attend Workshops related to your interests
    • Work with Center for Academic and Career Success on writing your resume and cover letter
    • Attend Job Fairs offered by Center for Academic and Career Success
    • Get experience (Internships, campus jobs, National Disability Mentoring Day, Job Shadowing, Workforce Recruitment Program)
    • Network with Professionals to learn more about careers
    Junior Year
    • Update your resume to include any new information such as internships or leadership positions
    • Have your resume critiqued by Center for Academic and Career Success
    • Attend the Job Fairs offered by Center for Academic and Career Success
    • Become a part-time employee or volunteer on a regular basis
    • Participate in National Disability Mentoring Day and the Workforce Recruitment Program
    • Visit Center for Academic and Career Success and work on your disclosure plan
    Senior Year
    • Discuss Disclosure and decide your disclosure plan
    • Discuss Accommodations and prepare your accommodations request script
    • Practice interviewing, including your disclosure and accommodation scripts, by participating in Mock Interviews with Center for Academic and Career Success
    • Attend all job fairs
    • Participate in the Workforce Recruitment Program
    • Contact your network about job openings
    • Check the Center for Academic and Career Success webpage for job openings
  • Guide on How to Disclose

    If you have a disability and are qualified to do a job, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) http://www.eeoc.gov/types/ada.html protects you from job discrimination on the basis of your disability. If you have a disability, you must also be qualified to perform the essential functions or duties of the job, with or without reasonable accommodation, in order to be protected from the job discrimination by the ADA.

    When discussing your disability with an employer, it is critical for you to consider whether or not you will require reasonable accommodations to complete the essential functions of the position. If you are unable to do so, it is important that you tell your employer directly. Be prepared to suggest possible options that will allow you to do the job safely and productively.

    Here are some handouts which can help you be more comfortable with the process. Center for Academic and Career Success is also here if you would like to discuss your additional questions and/or concerns, or simply talk with someone one-on-one.

  • Internship Opportunities

    All listed opportunities are paid or provide a stipend.

    This successful program is sponsored by and coordinated through the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) and the U.S. Department of Defense. WRP offers summer internships and full-time employment.  Registration typically begins late August to early October for the program while employers start contacting students as early as mid-January until summer.  Contact our office at success@cua.edu with any questions about the program.

    A representative comes to CUA’s campus every year to interview CUA students to determine if they are eligible for the program.  The program has resulted in internships for CUA students every year, including the Department of Defense and the National Coast Guard. One student also received and accepted a full-time position with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission after she completed her summer internship with the S.E.C. Interested students must complete a required application packet.

    **Please Note: Students who have participated in WRP must go through the process every year.**

    Here are just a few internship programs listed with AADP:

  • Job Websites

  • Other Valuable Career Resources

    • Career Guide for Students with Disabilities
    • EARNWorks – gives general advice for job seekers, including links to “Work from Home Job Banks,” and “Disability Employment Blogs and Discussion Boards.” http://askearn.org/
    • National Disability Mentoring Day -- national program that promotes career development for students and job-seekers with disabilities through job shadowing and hands-on career exploration area. The main website provides contact information for your state or region. http://www.dmd-aapd.org/
    • Career Expo for People with Disabilities -- opportunity to meet with Fortune 500 companies and government agencies looking to recruit new talent. Pre-registration is required. http://www.eop.com/expos.php. The Washington D.C. Career Expo usually takes place in the fall.
    • Check back frequently for updates.